Kayak flyfishing - My kayak endeavor actually started in a float tube. Fishing from places other than the shore or shallows gave me a taste for moving more about when I was fishing. I wanted to get out too. The tube was neat, the kayak is ideal. - Global FlyFisher

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Kayak flyfishing



Anchor, closed
Anchor, closed
The small anchor collapses to become even more compact, and - not least - to tangle less with fly lines and other gear. I fix the rope somewhere on the kayak and slide the carabiner up and down the rope and attach it so that the kayak swings in the direction I want.
Anchor, open
Anchor, open
A small kilo or 1 lb. anchor like this is more than enough to keep the kayak in place - in particular when mounted with a piece of chain like here.
Attachment string
Attachment string
A short string with some carabiners tied on can be very practical for securing stuff to the kayak. I usually hook my rod onto one of these while moving from one spot to the next.
Float tube
Float tube
I used to do a lot of float tubing. The tube is real handy when it comes to transportation and packing, but when it comes to moving on the water the kayak is so much faster.
Keep net
Keep net
If you want to keep fish, a net bag like this can be quite handy. It is bascally a large net bag supposed to be mounted on a frame, which I just tighten in both ends with a string.
Landing a fish
Landing a fish
It might seem narrow and unstable, but actually most ocean kayaks are very stable. I prefer landing my fish by hand, but a net might come in handy for some people. For really big fish that you want to bring home, a gaf might be appropriate.
My kayak
My kayak
My sit-on-top kayak is very convenient to get in and out of, easy to put on a car top and a great vessel to fish from.
Short trips
Short trips
The kayak is ideal for moving quickly from place to place while wade fishing.
Here I am crossing a narrow gap to an island where no one usually fishes. I do not need a great amount of gear, just my rod tucked down between my legs and my chest pack. For these short trips in warm water I ususally do not bring a life vest either.
Two types
Two types
The two basic types of kayaks: open type, sit-on-top (top) and the traditional type (bottom). Apart from one being open and the other closed, it is typical that the open type is shorter and wider than the slender, arctic type, which often is faster and more suitable for long trips. The shapes and profiles are simplified and generalised.
Watertight bag
Watertight bag
Watertight bags like this one from SeaLine are very nice for storing sensitive stuff such as cameras, mobine phones - and lunch packs.