All pictures, Bornholm 2002 - Global FlyFisher

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A break
A break
Joergen rests during a long days fishing. Being able to just lay down almost anywhere is the properly dressed fisher's privilege.
A hole
A hole
The soft sand stone will form the most amazing shapes under the influence of the water like this fantastic hole the size of a football swept in the clear, Baltic water with every wave.
A spawned fish
A spawned fish
The fish is no more than 1½ kilos. It should have been about 2 maybe more, but has lost a lot of weight during its spawning. These fish are typical and numerous in March on Bornholm.
Bent rod
Bent rod
Ken has hooked a fish that puts a nice bend in his rod.
Boots and butt
Boots and butt
Martin's boots and the butt of his Sierra Classic rod. The surface is typical soft Bornholm sandstone.
Butterfish
Butterfish
Steve is gettinh ready to unhook an exceptionally large and brown sea trout. The fish is obviously not happy with the situation.
Buying Baltic Glass
Buying Baltic Glass
It has become a tradition that we visit the Baltic Glass glass shop and buy a few souveniers. Steve signs the check and Sean watches anxiously.
Cliffs and waterline
Cliffs and waterline
The rocks and the cliffs of Bornholm makes the island a very special experience. When the water is as high as this, it lends a very special ambience to much of its coast.
Cold!
Cold!
If it looks cold it is because it is cold! Most of our days were a far cry from the spring we had dreamed of.
Commercial catch
Commercial catch
Commercial fisher's catch on the harbour in Hasle. This is small and medium size cod - a very common fish in the Baltic.
Cool Henning
Cool Henning
Henning obviously enjoying himself in spite of cold weather and too few fish.
Cool Joergen
Cool Joergen
Joergen enjoying the sun and regaining energy during a break.
Dirt
Dirt
When the water is high and the wind smashes waves against the soft cliffs, the dirt will immediately sweep out and ruin some very nice fishing locations.
Dirt
Dirt
One advantage of the small size of Bornholm and high elevation in many places, is the ease of assessing the water conditions. One look here says "dirt", and we can move on immediately.
Eating out
Eating out
Lunches are a ritual in themselves. A large box is filled with bread, spread, sussages, jam, cheese, coffee and tools, and we just cut and carve away. Eating out as good as it comes.
Eider duck
Eider duck
In the town of Gudhjem you have to stop by this house and check out the eider ducks on the door posts.
Exchanging views
Exchanging views
Ken talking to a fellow fisher in the water. Passing fishers often take the time to exchange views. Some of us do it like this in our favorite element.
Exhausted
Exhausted
Steve flat on his back after a morning's fishing, a good lunch and some Danish cake. The view is the Salene Bay.
Fish
Fish
A typical post spawn fish. If you look at the head only, it's a beauty, but the rest of the fish is often skinny and worn.
Fishing boat
Fishing boat
A typical, small, commercial fishing boat as they are seen in meany of the small Bornholm harbours.
Flowers
Flowers
Even though the weather at times was more like January than March, a few flowers had decided to peek their tiny heads out in the cold air.
G&T
G&T
Martin had put together a G&T kit for the ferry home, and Steve made sure we all had a night cap that could put us under for the night.
Glass, light, ocean.
Glass, light, ocean.
Glass, light and ocean. A perfect way of presenting the magnificent glass products.
Glassmaking
Glassmaking
In the glas shop Baltic Glass you can watch the glass blowers perform their amazing art.
Grabbing
Grabbing
Ken trying to grab a fish by its tail to gain control over it.
Gudhjem
Gudhjem
On the windy side the waves can be rough and yet very beautiful at the same time. This is near Gudhjem in a steep Eastern wind.
Henning and Ken
Henning and Ken
Henning and Ken assessing Henning's flyboxes. "A lot more organised than they used to be!" says Ken.
Henning's boxes
Henning's boxes
Henning's flyboxes are quite typical for our little group: a good selection of a few trusty patterns plus a few experiments.
Henning's cake
Henning's cake
Cake - and coffee - is a very important part of our trips, and this one is the first of many devoured by the party. This particular cake is home made by Henning.
Henning, broken rod and Mickey Finn
Henning, broken rod and Mickey Finn
Henning's rod was not only broken on a fish, but on a fish caught on a Mickey Finn - a pattern he used for the first time for ages.
High water at Arnager
High water at Arnager
The water has rarely been as high as it was this year. About 1 meter or 3 feet above its usual level it swept the soft rocks many places, where we would usually find a small beach.
Irish bar
Irish bar
Sean and Steve doing their best to empty an Irish bar of Brown Ale before the ferry left at midnigyht.
Joergen's Devil
Joergen's Devil
Joergen's Devil is a Big Hole Demon vartiation, which has show very effective during our years on Bornholm.
Kasper below the rocks
Kasper below the rocks
Kasper fishing below the rocks of Bornholm's northern coast.
Kasper in deep
Kasper in deep
Kasper is out where few others have been, far from the beach on a well known locale on the northern, rocky part of Bornholm. He managed the trip without getting wet, but was not rewarded with any fish for the strain.
Kelt
Kelt
A fish waiting to be released. Again a typical, slim kelt, which probably weighs about 2½ kilos, but should weigh 3½. Compare with the rod, which is a 7 wt. Loomis IMX with a sturdy 85 mm Waldron reel.
Ken sleeps
Ken sleeps
Ken snoring away like most of us like it: in a calm, sunny spot.
Ken with a fish
Ken with a fish
Ken with a nice fish: silvery, but slim. It has fought long, was very well hooked, but is ready to be returned to the water.
Ken's flies
Ken's flies
Ken shows Sean his immense collection of flies. Ken ties flies almost every day and has enough flies for a lifetime of fishing for salmon and sea trout.
Ken's salad
Ken's salad
Ken trying desperately to hide the fact that he actually had a salad for his steak. Ken is a meat eater and will usually not touch vegetables.
Landing
Landing
A very typical way of gaining control over a fish is to get it in between the rocks in the shallow. Here it is much easier to unhook it.
Martin into a fish
Martin into a fish
Martin has hooked a nice fish in the last daylight on the northern side of Bornholm. In the back a large ship has found shelter from the rough south eastern winds.
On the phone
On the phone
Ken on the cell phone. Phones are becoming a more and more important part of the Danish coastal fishing. Some consider them a menace, but we tend to consider them a very long range 'fish finder'.
Ready to land
Ready to land
Martin is about ready to land the fish, which in spite of its moderate size and condistion puts up a good fight.
Release
Release
Far most of our catch was released again. Of the 40-or-so fish we caught during a week, only two wound up in the freezer.
Releasing a fish
Releasing a fish
Ken releases a fish. These post spawn sea trout are often worn out from the fight and need some help regaining their breath.
Resting
Resting
Resting by Skanserne south of Nexoe on Bornholm. This area is a place we often flee to when the wind is sominated by northwestern gales.
Salene lunch
Salene lunch
Lunch break in the Salene Bay. The small bench has seen many a well done sandwich and many a shiny sea trout.
Sean
Sean
Sean getting the feeling for a new type of fishing. Stripping a blind fished wet fly is something very different from presenting a dry fly to a seen fish.
Sean casting
Sean casting
Sean casting as he never did anything else. This is in fact his 10th cast or so in a very different type of water with a very different type of gear.
Sean naps
Sean naps
Sean takes a nap in the sun. Napping like this cannot be compared to sleeping anywhere else.
Sean resting
Sean resting
Sean enjoying the beautiful landscape of Bornholm, where rock, sea and Danish idyll merges together.
Sean's money (soon gone)
Sean's money (soon gone)
Sean wanted to blow his last Danish money in an Irish pub in Roenne. We were more than willing to help him! Especially Steve...
Splash!
Splash!
The waves crashing against the pier outside Gudhjem makes the splashes rise up to 10 meters or 30 feet. This is not dry fly weather!
Steve casts
Steve casts
Steve lays out yet another cast during the last fishing day on Bornholm.
Steve snores
Steve snores
Steve ocasionally dozes off like the rest of the party, snoring loudly into the sun.
Steve's fish
Steve's fish
Steve managed to land more than a few fish this year. This specimen is another typical representative of the post spawned sea trout.
Steve's sandwich
Steve's sandwich
Steve's more-than-enough sandwich: cheese, Danish liver pate, salami and raspberry preserve. Yummy!
Super7
Super7
The Super7 lined up for a group photo. From the left it is: Henning Eskol (DK), Joergen Nielsen (DK), Martin Joergensen (DK), Ken Bonde (DK), Steve Schweitzer (USA), Kasper Muhlbach (DK/SE) and Sean Miller (USA).
The Four Amigos
The Four Amigos
The Four Amigos: Steve, Ken, Sean and Joergen. Breaks are mostly as much fun as the fishing and a very important part of the trip.
The usual suspects
The usual suspects
An impressive linup: Sage RPL with Lamson Velocity, Orvis with Tioga, Sage with Orvis Battenkil, Sage with Lamson Litespeed, Sage with Loop Evotech and Loomis IMX with Waldron - gear for about 50,000 Danish Kroner or about 6,000 US$.
Three Amigos
Three Amigos
The three amigos: Steve, Henning and Ken.
Tired fish
Tired fish
Even though the post spawn fish fight hard, they will usually not run or jump, but seek down and come in close. When they have been tired, they can mostly be unhooked with little effort.
Tracks
Tracks
Our tracks in the sand cast long shadows in the late afternoon. A few waves and they are gone - as are we after a long, fruitless fishing day.
Two different fish
Two different fish
Kasper and Steve with each their representative of the variations within sea trout: Kasper's fish is a socalled Greenlander - a small fish that has not spawned yet but fed all winter - while Steve's is an extremely dark, almost brown trout like, male that has spawned and is still reviving from the feat. Both fish were released after the picture was taken.
Unhooking
Unhooking
Ken trying to unhook a fish as close to the water as possible. Avoiding lifting the fish is often impossible due to some very good hookups.
Waiting for steaks
Waiting for steaks
Steve, Sean and Kasper waiting anxiously for their steaks at the loacl steak house. This was the laste meal on the trip and the first meal out during the whole trip.