Iceland, 5Ĺ days - Iceland is best known for its salmon fishing, but the island has some of the world's best brown trout fishing too... and arctic char... and sea trout. So GFF partner Martin Joergensen and his friend Asger Olesen had 5Ĺ great days of fishing the summer of 2003. - Global FlyFisher

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Iceland, 5Ĺ days



A typical brown trout
A typical brown trout
Asger presents a typical Icelandic brown trout in a hail of mosquitoes.
Almost intimidating
Almost intimidating
The sheer size of a trout water like the Lax√° can be scaring. But the fishing is fairly easy and the number of fish endless.
Angelica
Angelica
The plant angelica was very widespread along the waters we fished - here at the Ytri Rang√°. Beautiful and with a nice scent it added to the ambience of the already fascinating country.
as smooth as...
as smooth as...
An amazing pool on the Litl√° - a wide, slow and shallow stretch with some deeper runs. Fish were rising, probably to mosquitoes, which hatched in plenty numbers during calm periods.
Asger's last
Asger's last
The last brown trout from Lax√°. Within minutes after this picture was taken, we were on the way to the airport in Akuayri.
Asger's last - again
Asger's last - again
Another shot of Asger's last fish.
Black Bead Nymph
Black Bead Nymph
A simple, small, black, beaded nymph was very efficient on smaller Icelandic fish. The larger ones were resting deeper, and craved something heavier.
Black Frances
Black Frances
This incarnation of the Frances clearly shows its primary hallmark: the stripped down hackle stems in the rear of the fly.
Bleiktogblatt
Bleiktogblatt
Bleika is the Icelandic name for Arctic Char, for which this lovely fly is meant. Pink and kingfisher combined with silver and teal... what a combo! The original has a brass bead for a head - i like the silver cone better.
Bleka
Bleka
Bleka is the Icelandic name for Arctic Char. martin caught this one on a nymph - topping off his Icelandic Grand Slam - sea trout, brown trowt and bleka in one day on the same water.
Brown
Brown
A nice Lax√° Brown taken on a streamer.
Buzzzzz...!
Buzzzzz...!
Mosquitoes can be a plague - even though our friend and guide Jon assured us that this was nothing!
Cigar
Cigar
Celebrating with a cigar on the bank of Litl√°.
Click!
Click!
Martin snaps a picture of Asger and a fish with the grand backdrop of the the Lax√°.
Dirt!
Dirt!
Unfortunately we were plagued by weed in the water in both Litl√° and Lax√°. The drastically reduced our efficience, and we agreed on that fishing during a weedless period would have been beayond belief.
Downstream
Downstream
Larger fish will often be resting in the deeper parts below small falls like this one on the Litla√°. A deeply fished Woolly Bugger or Dog Nobbler can do wonders in such places.
Dry fly sneaker
Dry fly sneaker
Casting a dry fly to working trout from the bank. Dry fly seemed to be much less productive than streamers or nymphs. It may well be because we fished too large flies. The fish are probably mostly rising to mosquitoes, which will call for a size 20 or smaller fly.
First try
First try
Our first try for Icelandic sea trout. The guide was very surprised that we did not manage to hook up within a few casts. But even he could not entice the fish to bite.
Fishmobile
Fishmobile
Arni Baldurson and employee Stefan of Angling Club Lax√° passed by for a chat on the Litl√° in their impressive fishmobile. Cars like this are a necessity if you want to be able to cover all waters in Iceland.
Gale force casting
Gale force casting
Martin casting into the wind on LitlaŠ where he managed to land a good bunch of fish on a deep fished nymph.
Golden drops
Golden drops
The gang of three toasting in a glass of golden Scotch in the small cabin by Laxá. From the right it is Jón, Martin and Asger.
Hooked
Hooked
There was a deeper run in front of the small island opposite Martin where fish would willingly take a nymph.
In the rain again
In the rain again
Asger casting in the rain on the lower Lax√°. The amount of dirt in the water and drops in the air almost made us give up. But as always on Iceland the weather changed rapidly and we had a swell evening.
Just beaded!
Just beaded!
The deeply fished bead head nymph proved to be as efficient in Iceland as on most other trout waters on the planet. Both large and small fish - like this one - took it with vigor.
Last evening
Last evening
Our last evening on the Lax√° turned out to be very beautiful indeed. And fish were working all over the wide river, chasing our flies and everything else that moved. A perfect time to pack in and leave...!
LitlaŠ rapid
LitlaŠ rapid
Above were the small fish, below were the larger ones. We enjoyed both the fishing and the sight of this small LitlaŠ fall.
Litla√°
Litla√°
The Litla√° is a beautiful and very varying stream, which is further beautified by the magnificent sky over Iceland. And even though its name means "little stream", it is not that small.
Mosquitoes!
Mosquitoes!
The abundance of mosquitoes was amazing. These were harmless moquitoes that didn't do anything else than get in your ears, mouth, eyes and nose. Bad enough, but not too bad.
Nice brown
Nice brown
This was my first Iceland brown trout - a nice 50 centimeter or 20 inch fish that put up a very good fight before it wound up on the grass for a quick shot. It now swins the Litla√° again, waiting for my fly some other day.
Nice sea trout
Nice sea trout
This was my second fish in Iceland - a sea trout. Somewhat more slender than its brown kindred and not amongst the really big ones of its own kind, this one probably measured a little less than 50 centimeters or 20 inches. It took a deep fished nymph.
Nice sea trout about to be released
Nice sea trout about to be released
We released most of our fish during the Iceland trip.
Rain and weed
Rain and weed
The two curses of our trip: rain and weed. The first is unavoidable on Iceland, but the latter only occurs in the warmest and rainiest periods during the summer.
Red Frances
Red Frances
An odd fly if there ever was one, but very popular in Iceland. The fly is big and heavy.
Red Snelda
Red Snelda
A fly recommended by our friend Jon. It is also tied in black and often fished in teams of two - both tied on copper tubes!
Releasing
Releasing
Jon releasing a small brown trout.
Removing dirt
Removing dirt
Every cast meant removing dirt from the fly and knots on the leader - a task we soon grew very tired from.
Risers
Risers
In calm periods we would see planty fish rise on smooth surfaces like this. They were not easy - but neither impossible - to get to take a dry fly.
Rods in place
Rods in place
Every move meant securing the rods on the rod holders on our grand Skoda Octavia four wheel drive. Make sure you bring those when fishing many waters.
Room with a view
Room with a view
Who can complain about a place like this? Martin resting on the banks of Litl√°.
Saved by the fishing limo!
Saved by the fishing limo!
The rods are ready, the car is ready, we are ready! The Skoda four wheel drive gave us a smooth and safe ride.
VarmŠ
VarmŠ
The guide was surprised that Martin didn't catch a fish in the first cast here, but no matter how much we tried we caught nothing in VarmŠ.
View
View
Stunning views are the trademark of Iceland and its flat top mountains are very charactersitic of many of those views.
Ytri Rangš
Ytri Rangš
The Ytri RangŠ is a genuine, classical Icelandic salmon water with all the attractions that it needs: water, landscape and plenty salmon.