Published Jun 6. 1997 - 20 years ago
Updated or edited Sep 8. 2016

Charlie's Phesant Tail Nymph

The Pheasant tail nymph is a true classic. The original was tied by Frank Sawyer using only copper thread and phesant tail fibers. This pattern has been elaborated a bit by Charles A.Garwood from North Carolina, and uses peacock herl for the abdomen and regular tying thread.


The Pheasant tail nymph is a true classic. The original was tied by Frank Sawyer using only copper thread and phesant tail fibers. This pattern has been elaborated a bit by Charles A.Garwood from North Carolina, and uses peacock herl for the abdomen and regular tying thread.

Hook12-16 down eye wet fly hook
WeightCopper wire
ThreadTan
TailPhesant tail fibers
BodyPhesant tail fibers
RibCopper wire
AbdomenPeacock herl
Wing casePhesant tail fibers
HackleFalse and sparse from phesant tail fibers
HeadColor of thread
  1. Form a small oval ball of copper wire on the front half of the hook shank
  2. Tie in a few phesant tail fibers as tail over the hook bend. 6-10 will suffice.
  3. Tie in copper wire
  4. Wind the phesant tail fibers to the middle of the hook shank an tie down. Leave surplus.
  5. Wind the copper ribbing opposite the body, tie down and cut surplus.
  6. Tie in a few peacock herl. 2-4 will suffice.
  7. Wind the to just behind the hook eye to form a fairly thick abdomen
  8. Pull the phesant tail fibers forwards over the abdomen to form a wing case.
  9. Tie down and cut surplus.
  10. Tie in a few phesat tail fibers to form a false hackle. 3-5 in each side will suffice.
  11. Form a small head over the materials.
  12. Whip finish and varnish.

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