Videos by Mc. Fly Lures

Top 3 Trout Flies!

The best fly patterns are the ones that are the most versatile. Ones that can mimic many types of forage. Trout flies are no different. You can be out on the water and all of a sudden, out of no where, you notice that the trout start rising to the surface, or stop coming up for mayflies and go deep. Conditions change, and you don't want to be caught off guard. Its important to have flies in your box that can cater to a wide variety of conditions and techniques for when those unexpected changes happen. I have picked 3 flies that I feel will allow you to fish pretty much any situation presented to you. If you have all 3 of these flies, they will cater to anything the trout throw at you. My dry fly pick is the adams, a wonderful and amazing dry fly pattern that really can cater to any dry fly fishing situation. Ive used smaller ones for midge imitations, and larger ones for mayfly. You won't easily find a rising trout that won't eat an adams. My nymphing pick is the zebra midge. Midges are probably the most important and common food source for trout. They are in almost all rivers throughout the world, and trout never stop feeding on them. Even when all else shuts down, trout will still occasionally sip up a midge when it drifts past their nose. They cannot resist it. This is why the zebra midge is probably the most important and versatile nothing (sub surface) pattern. It can mimic midges, but it will also mimic other aquatic bugs when tied in different sizes and color patterns. Its also very easy to tie, so you can make up a few hundred in an afternoon. My streamer pick is the wooly bugger. This is probably no surprise to most of you. The wooly bugger is well known as a very versatile fly. One that can be fished in many different ways, tied in many different colors, and for many different species. Try fishing a smaller bugger by dead drifting it by a trouts nose. They won't say no to that meal. Or to cover more water, you can swing it through the current. You can also strip it through slow moving pools. It really is probably the most versatile fly ever created. In all honestly, if you could only pick one fly, this would be the best bet. Ive even used the bugger as a dry fly once, when I forgot to bring my dry fly box with me. So it really is the most versatile fly ever made.

I Broke my Sage Method Fly Rod

Breaking your rod has to be one of the worst feelings to have while fishing. Especially when its such a high end rod. This Sage Method retails for $850 and is an absolute amazing fly rod, especially for fishing streamers. Luckily Sage, along with some other high end rod makers offer a no questions asked lifetime warranty for the original owner. It still costs about $70 because you have to pay the shipping back and fourth, however they will fix your rod no matter what for that cost, which is a lot better than $850. The turn around time though is a little slow, and it can take 3 weeks to a month. Really, the fact that this rod broke doesn't speak to bad quality of this rod. Its really a fantastic fly rod, but it is made of high modulus graphite. While that allows for a light, and fast action blank, the rod can be a bit fragile when it comes to impacts. And that is what happened here. If you never hit a rock with your rod, then this rod will not break, not on any fish. Its almost impossible to break it when its used the way it properly should. This was an interesting day. The weather could not figure out what it wanted to do. It rained, then got sunny, then snowed, then got sunny again. It kept doing this multiple times. I was able to get one brown at least, however I could not get any more after breaking the only rod I brought on this trip. These little lakes are great for fishing big browns. Last time I came here I ended up with a 27" brown trout, and 2 other browns right around 20". Also, you don't really need waders and you are not getting in the water. With a really good cast, you can almost reach the center of each of these little lakes, and there are lots of fish everywhere. Not just browns, but rainbows as well.

Squishy Head Bluegill

A while back I created a fly that I called "the fat head squishy streamer". This was a perch color pattern and shape. These flies utilized a special long fiber dry fly dubbing from Fly Tiers Dungeon. Then I created a shell of flexible UV curing resin to give the fly a special jerk bait type motion. It kept the fly sinking very slowly, and allowed for a side to side "walk the dog" type motion. Keep in mind, the technique of using flexible UV resin is not my invention, I have seen others do this. However I haven't ever seen anyone use it with a dry fly (high floating) dubbing. This fly was very popular, and I have had a lot of requests for different color patterns. For a long time I have wanted to make a bluegill pattern, but bullfrog dubbing didn't come in blue, which I needed for the pattern. Finally Fly Tiers Dungeon came out with a dubbing they call "arctic snow" and it comes in lots of bright and colorful blends. Finally a squishy head streamer in a a bluegill pattern! What is different however is how this fly is shaped. The original was cylindrical, so it was as fat as it was tall. However this fly is very flat, yet tall, just like a bluegill. Which gives it even better side to side and gliding motion, just like a dying bluegill. Hook: Gamakatsu SS15 - size 1/0 Thread: Danville 210 flat waxed - white Dubbing: Bullfrog dubbing - white, olive, dark olive & yellow Starburst dubbing - pearl & olive. Arctic Wind - hot orange, aqua blue, royal blue Eyes: 3D eyes - 8mm, gold Resin: Solarez - flex formula

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