Published Sep 16. 2012 - 9 years ago
Updated or edited Nov 27. 2020

#260 - Bob Wilson

Bob Wilson - Ted Patlen Tied by: Ted Patlen Originated by: Robert Wilson Source: Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing, Bates Pg. 233-234 Hook: Unknown 3xl...

#260 Bob Wilson - Ted Patlen #260 Bob Wilson - Ted Patlen


Tied by: Ted Patlen
Originated by: Robert Wilson
Source: Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing, Bates Pg. 233-234


Hook: Unknown 3xl streamer hook
Thread: Yellow
Tail: Short golden pheasant crest curving upward
Body: Copper wire or embossed copper tinsel
Throat: Black hackle
Wing: 2 matching sections of barred wood duck long and narrow, extending just beyond the tail
Head: Yellow

Notes: The pattern was originated in Scotland by a young Robert Wilson around 1890 as a wet fly pattern. Later on, Mr Wilson moved to Old Greenwich, Connecticut where the fly was converted to a streamer configuration. A friendly rivalry sprung up between Mr. Wilson and his friend Mr. George Fraser, pitting the Bob Wilson against the Fraser Streamer. There was no clear winner. The tail of the streamer was often clipped to even out the tips.

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Comments

Comment to #260 - Bob Wilson...

I'm a big fan of barred wood duck, copper, and GP crests. Great material choice by the original tyer. Very nice work. I enjoyed reading the history too of this fly. You did an excellent job with this fly.

Comment to #260 - Bob Wilson...

I had never heard of this pattern until now,staying in Scotland myself,i will have to tie some up.I think this streamer will work great on those big "back end trout"....

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