Published May 25. 2017 - 3 years ago
Updated or edited Dec 3. 2020

Tying the Black Ghost Marabou

The Black Ghost Marabou is a simple to tie fly that is a killer on both lake and stream. The Black Ghost has it's roots in Maine's Rangeley region and...

The Black Ghost Marabou is a simple to tie fly that is a killer on both lake and stream. The Black Ghost has it's roots in Maine's Rangeley region and was designed by the famous fly tyer Herb Welch back in the 1920's. The original Black Ghost is one of the most popular and well known streamers and has spawned a number of variations. The original streamer that Herb developed was tied using a white saddle hackle wing. This marabou version is a great addition to the lineup and compliments the bucktail and hackle versions. The marabou version has become a staple in many streamer wallets for good reason. This pattern is a little easier to tie and the action of the marabou wing differs from that of the bucktail or hackle wing. Tie smaller sizes #6 or smaller, for casting and larger sizes for trolling. This is a great fly pattern to cast after ice out and during the summer it makes a perfect fly to troll with.

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Dubbing tutorial
Tool tutorial


Black Ghost Marabou Recipe



Hook: Mustad L87 #2-8
Thread: Black 6/0
Tail: Yellow Schlappen base
Body: Black wool or Laser Dubbing
Rib: Silver oval tinsel or flat braid
Wing: White marabou
Throat: Yellow Schlappen base
Head: Black
Eyes: White w/ black pupil (paint)
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