Recent comments

  • Reply to: Merry Christmas!   6 months 3 weeks ago

    Would love to see a video of this fly being made!!!!

  • Reply to: Hooligan Crab   6 months 3 weeks ago

    Thanks for sharing my crab fly. I've adjusted it a little since the original, originally this was intended for trigger fish which was why I went for the flyliner which triggers can't crush like standard hooks, but this is a difficult hook to drive home. I now tie them on Gamakatsu teflon coated carp hooks which are still pretty resilient against the trigger's teeth but easier to drive home.

    Cheers

    Martyn

  • Reply to: The decline of GFF   6 months 3 weeks ago

    Thank you for being around to read. And more fly tying videos, please.

    It's been 40+ degrees c for the last three days here in Adelaide, Australia, and continuing.

  • Reply to: The decline of GFF   6 months 3 weeks ago

    Congratulations! A decision growing inside me too. Back to a house, far from Stockholm and all the boring pikes. Back to Öresund?

  • Reply to: Meade's crazy flies   7 months 1 week ago

    :) Funny looking flies. I like them. Thanks for sharing. BK

  • Reply to: The Regal mystery   7 months 1 week ago

    I bought my Regal Vise back in '89, that was before they put the round decal on top of the vise body. I chose Regal as I needed a solid, strong vise. Previously I used a screw type and a lever type, both wore out the tightening mechanism (I tied a whole lotta flies).
    I turned pro in '90 and taught 30 tyers to tie flies (mostly Trout, then Bass flies for a well known outfit in Vermont). I still use the Regal and find the hook hold as good as ever from #22's to #3/0 Blind Eye Spey and Dee hooks. Mine is a clamp model and the only thing I find now is that clamp screw needs tightening on the underside of benchtop now and again.So maybe the Regal bench clamp could be better designed to enable a firmer grip on the bench top.

  • Reply to: 20 Years in the Fly Fishing Business   7 months 1 week ago

    Just wanted to comment about Mike's Badger Creek store. I've been tying for years. Went to fly show in Atlanta. My brother went to rest of the show while I hung out at the Badger Creek stall. I was SO impressed with the quality of material. His necks and capes have now supplanted numerous ones that I accumulated over the years. Great to read the story behind such a quality company. Hope to see ya'll again in february

  • Reply to: Dual Tube Phlyz   7 months 2 weeks ago

    Eugene,

    You figured it out yourself: the line goes through the lower tube and the hook will hang short of the longer top tube and tail.

    Martin

  • Reply to: Dual Tube Phlyz   7 months 2 weeks ago

    This may be a dumb question but how do you rig the dual tube? You'd have to run the line through the lower tube to take advantage of the more forward hook so I'm guessing that's how you do it. I'm also guessing the wing causes it to swim right-side up. Let me know if my assumptions are correct if you don't mind. I love the idea. The more forward hook placement would really increase hook-ups.

  • Reply to: Kola autumn   7 months 3 weeks ago

    i ll miss кольский :)

  • Reply to: Fly Fishing Snow Day   7 months 3 weeks ago

    Great video and even greater stream. Nothing beets winter fishing. Enjoyed it.

  • Reply to: Hugh   8 months 5 hours ago

    @Jernau,

    A classic Sunray Shadow has an even longer wing and a hook placed in the absolute front. Some Sunrays are 20-25 centimeters or 4-5 inches long! Still the "short hook, long wing" flies have worked well for ages, and personally I think the fear of "tail nibbling" is vastly exaggerated. Most fish seem to attack with vigor, swallow most of almost any fly and even go for the front of the fly as they charge.

    The Sunray Shadow can be seen here: http://globalflyfisher.com/patterns/sunray-shadow
    And here's a whole article about short hooks and long wings: http://globalflyfisher.com/tie-better/short-hook-long-wing

    The fly in the video barely qualifies as a long winged fly in my eyes, but is very much along the lines and proportions of most of the hair winged salmon flies fished here in Scandinavia.

    Martin

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