Videos by McFly Angler

Articulated Brahma Bugger

A few months ago I tied up a fly called the Brahma Bugger, which I did not invent but loved fishing and tying the fly very much! The fly was originally tied by the tightlines youtube channel, and I re-named the fly "soft hackle bugger" because I did not use a brahma pelt, but instead used a soft hackle pelt from whiting. That video did really well, and that fly has been an amazing fish catcher for me. So I set out to improve on the fly, and make it better for a wider range of fish species. I wanted to articulate the fly, and give it even more movement in the water. So I present you with the articulated brahma bugger, which catches more fish than I could imagine. In fact, it far out fished any other fly I had with me on my last trip. I could not keep the fish off of it. And it seemed to attract some really large trout as well! This articulated fly is really my favorite streamer now, and I don't think I will be fishing anywhere without at least a few in my box. As always I am listing all the materials I used on this fly, along with a discount code to the Fly Artist, which is an online fly shop that I have been working with lately. When checking out at the fly artist, just type in the code "McFly10" at checkout and you will get your 10% off. On top of the best deals you can find online, you will also get great customer service from them, and free shipping for as little as $35 spent. Discount Code! McFly10 Hook I used: Firehole sticks #811 in size 6 Alternative hook: Gamakatsu B10S - https://www.flyartist.com/products/gamakatsu-b10s-stinger-hook Shank I used: Small sized Fish Joint - http://www.flytyersdungeon.com/Materials/Chart_Miscellaneous.htm Alternative Shank: OPST Intruder Shank - https://www.flyartist.com/products/opst-intruder-shanks Thread: Veevus 6/0 in Olive - https://www.flyartist.com/products/veevus-6-0-thread Feathers I used: Whiting Coq de Leon soft hackle with chickabou pelt died Chartreuse Alternative feathers: Mets Mini Marabou - https://www.flyartist.com/products/hareline-mini-marabou-chickabou-feathers And soft hackle - https://www.flyartist.com/products/metz-soft-hackle-feathers Wire: Small Intruder wire in black - https://www.flyartist.com/products/senyos-intruder-trailer-hook-wire Cement: Brush on Zap a Gap - https://www.flyartist.com/collections/fly-tying-head-cements-glues-uv-resins/products/zap-a-gap-brush-on?variant=7742701895739 Head cement: Solarez "Bone Dry" UV resin - https://www.flyartist.com/collections/fly-tying-head-cements-glues-uv-resins/products/solarez-bone-dry-ultra-thin-uv-resin?variant=12978728697915

Fishing in the Jemez Mountains

Hares Ear

The hares ear is a fly that has been around for ages, however its still as effective today as it was over a century ago. The simplicity is really what makes this fly so popular. Its very easy to tie with a very small amount of materials, yet still comes out looking amazing! No one really knows where this fly comes from or who originated it. Some will say Izaak Walton in the late 1800's, but we really don't know exactly. What we do know is that this fly works, and works wonderfully! More frequently you see these tied with a tail made of rabbit fur. They would clip a small clump, tie that in at the tail, then dub the body, then tie in a section of turkey wing or pheasant tail fibers for the wing case. I find using the Pheasant tail to start with at the tail negates an extra step, so its much easier and quicker to tie. Also I think it looks better as well, and for me fishes a bit better. So its a win win. Not only is this fly easy to tie, but it also looks really good. Its really cool that you are using the same dubbing throughout to create the abdomen and the thorax, but dubbed in different degree's of tightness to create a different look. The abdomen when dubbed tightly really does have the perfect "bugginess" look to it. And the thorax when dubbed loose will be perfect for looking like legs of nymph. This is really one of my favorite nymphs to fill a box with because its not only effective, looks great, and can be tied to mimic a wide variety of bug species, its very easy and quick to tie, and I can fill a box in a matter of a few hours. It also looks equally as nice with a bead head, and as different sizes as well. Heck, for really small ones try tying with a finer dubbing. Speaking of a wide variety of bug species, these are more than likely made to mimic baetis or mayflies, however I know they can mimic caddis as well. Some people even tie these with slight alterations to look like stoneflies. They are very versatile. As always I am providing a list of materials used on this fly, and also links to the fly artist with a discount code as a thank you for being my subscriber. Please use that as it will save you money on Your Discount: McFlySubs Hook I used: Firehole Sticks #633 - https://fireholeoutdoors.com/product/firehole-sticks-633-50-pack/ Alternative Hook Recommendation: Daiichi 1560 - https://www.flyartist.com/collections/daiichi-hooks/products/daiichi-1560-traditional-nymph-hook Thread: Veevus 6/0 - https://www.flyartist.com/products/veevus-6-0-thread Tail/Wing case: Natural Pheasant Tail - https://amzn.to/2RvVPMw Ribbing: I used Gold flat tinsel, but round or oval tinsel will work better (or even gold wire) - https://www.flyartist.com/products/uni-french-oval-tinsel. Dubbing: Natural Hares Ear Plus: https://www.flyartist.com/products/hareline-hares-ear-plus-dubbing Resin: Solarez "Thin Hard" UV Resin: https://www.flyartist.com/products/solarez-thin-uv-resin

New Redington Butterstick Review!

The Redington butterstick has been one of the leading glass rods out on the market. It always had decent sales compared to other brands rods, and it always was pretty good. However they changed it this year, and I believe they hit it out of the park! Absolutely one of my favorite rods for fishing small creeks and streams. So, generally with glass rods you loose accuracy, distance, and generally get a heavier rod. Not so with this new butterstick. This is hands down the most accurate rod at shorter distances I have ever used. Now being glass you still arent going to get a rod that will cast 100 feet with ease, but you are getting a rod that can cast further than most glass rods out on the market. And surprisingly this is very light weight, with a super light swing weight. I mean, there isn't a rod out there that I think would do better within 30 feet, casting small dry flies and nymphs than this rod. For small creek fishing around my area, I would rather have this rod than a $900 sage x, Scott Radian, or Orvis Helios 3. And that is saying a lot since they are all very excellent rods! And this is only $250 which is a whole lot cheaper. So what this rod can do is cast accurately, with a light swing weight at shorter distances. All for a pretty good price at just $250. It is great for dry fly fishing and smaller nymph rigs. Their lineup while somewhat limited, does have in my opinion perfect lengths for each weight they offer. It is also very durable, and very unlikely to break on you. What this rod doesn't do is cast large streamers or poppers, any fly with weight, or long distance casting of any sort. This is not a rod that is going to bomb a stimulator 100 feet across a large river to a rising trout. For that, stick with a rod like the Sage X.

Matts Midge

Articulated Rainbow Streamer

A while back, a subscriber and customer of mine requested that I make a large articulated streamer for him. He wanted something for large browns pushing 30" that are primarily predatory in a lake he fishes. He has witnessed the browns attacking rainbow trout up to 10 inches, and says they just wont eat anything else. So, I started on this pattern. I spent a few weeks getting the tying down on this fly, and blew through quite a few hooks. I started off with a lead dumbbell eye for weight and to keep it swimming upright, and then settled on keeling the fly with some lead wraps. He wanted to keep this from sinking too fast though, as he was going to fish it on a sink tip line. So I found the minimum wraps of lead was 5 on a .025 lead wire to keep it swimming upright. Also, after I filmed this video, I realized that you have to fish it for a minute or two, getting it to sink underwater to soak up water in the rabbit strip in order for it to relax while swimming. The hide holds air bubbles, and wants to rise to the surface. Which makes for a funny looking back on the fly. However I don't think that will effect its fishability as it could be perceived to a fish as a dorsal fin. However after a few minutes of fishing (or me soaking it in a bowl of water) I did find that it swam more evenly, and that tail kicked out to the side more, rather than wanting to lift up. So I myself have not been able to fully test this fly on fish. I just don't have anywhere I can fish for large browns or pike, or bass that are praying on 6" rainbows. However I will keep you guys updated on whether or not this works out for him, and if he allows, maybe post up a picture of his very large brown trout he catches with it. However after working on getting this fly to swim just right for a few months, I am confident fish will like it based on its action. Ok as promised here is a list of the materials I used on this fly. Tail Hook: Gamakatsu B10S in size 2 Front Hook: Ahrex PR320 in size 4/0 Thread: Veevus 140 Power thread in Olive Tail Feathers: Olive and White Blood Quill Marabou Tail Flash: Pearl Krystal Flash Top Wing: Black Barred Olive Rabbit Strip Belly: Custom Dubbing Brush Pink Accent: Pink Version of the Custom Dubbing Brush Wire: Thin Black Intruder Wire Bead: I got it at walmart... Just find a random plastic bead with holes large enough for the wire to fit through twice. Dubbing: White and Olive Senyos Laser Dub Eye: 7mm "Ice" Living Eyes Eye Adhesive: Gell Super Glue Head Cement: Solarez "ultra thin" UV Resin

Brahma Bugger

What is commonly called the "brahma" bugger is an improvement on the original wooly bugger due to its incredible look, and movement when under the water. This fly pulsates due to the chickabou and soft hackle makeup. Now I call this the "soft hackle bugger" because I dont tie it with a brahma pelt. I find any soft hackle pelt with chickabout, or even the mini marabou packages paired up with the soft hackle packages will give the exact same effect for less money. You can also get longer or shorter fibered soft hackles this way, and a wider range of colors as well than just using the whiting brahma pelts. Basically any type of hen soft hackle with chickabou (or mini marabou) will work for this fly. I also added a bit of flash in the tail like I do with original wooly buggers, which from my knowledge wasn't originally done with the first version of this brahma bugger. You can also make this two tone, or even stripped by changing out colors of the hackle as well. For instance, alternating a darker and lighter hackle will give a neat effect. If you can stick around to the end of this video, I put some underwater footage of this fly, showing just how well this flows in the water. This fly really moves well, and every fiber seems to vibrate. The fly also pushes a fair amount of water as well, so its a great fly for many situations. I love swinging this fly in riffles for trout, but also it makes a great fly for a sink tip in a deep pool, or even in lakes for bass. Just like the original wooly bugger, I suspect this will work for just about any species out there including some salt water ones as well. As always im listing all the materials I used on this fly. Hook: Daiichi 1740 in size 8 Thread: Veevus 6/0 Tail: Chickabou/mini marabou Flash: Holographic Flashabou Body: Soft Hackle Head Cement: Solarez "ultra thin" UV Resin

RS2

The RS2 is one of the more simple, yet effective flies out there. Especially for tailwater rivers that require small presentations. This fly looks great all the way down to size 26, and is relatively easy to tie in that size. But you can also fish them up to size 16 or possibly even larger if you so choose. The fly has a limited amount of materials, and once you get the hang of tying these, you can nock them out pretty quickly. They can mimic a midge emerger, or even a baetis emerger deepening on the color and size you tie it. Common colors are black, brown, gray, and olive. Also they can be tied in two tone as well. Build your body with one color dubbing, then add the wing, then make the head with another color dubbing. Gives an interesting look. Try gray/black, olive/brown, and white/black. Or get creative and make your own combo. So I am using a dry fly hook for this, as I like the CDC to actually keep this up off the bottom. How I fish this is behind another fly which is weighted, to keep it down on the bottom, then this fly rides up higher to look like a bug emerging. However if you want this closer to the bottom, you can tie it with a heavier wire nymph hook, and even add some weight with some lead wire if you so choose. But be careful about adding too much lead as it will bulk up your fly. Hook: Daiichi 1110 size 20 Thread: Black Veevus 16/0 Tail: Clear Microfibetts or Mayfly Tails Dubbing: Black UV2 Fine and Dry Wing: White CDC Oiler Puff Glue: Hard as Hull Head Cement

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